1. Section 1: School Context: Foundation Statements, History and Demographics
      1. School Council Involvement in Education Plan Development
      2. Education Plan Distribution
      3. PHPS Foundation Statements
      4. School Foundation Statements
      5. Historical Background
      6. Demographics
    2. Section 2: Outcomes, Measures, Strategies and Commentary
      1. Alignment of Outcomes to Key Strategies
      2. SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY FOCUS
        1. Address the Diversity of Student Needs
      3. OUTCOME ONE: Alberta Students are successful.
      4. OUTCOME TWO: The achievement gap between First Nations, Metis and Inuit students andall other students is eliminated.
      5. OUTCOME THREE: Alberta’s education system is inclusive.
      6. OUTCOME FOUR: Alberta has excellent teachers, school and school authority leaders.
        1. Jurisdiction Outcome 4-A
      7. OUTCOME FIVE: The education system is well governed and managed.
    3. Section 3: Performance Measure Results and other Quantitative Data
      1. OUTCOME ONE: Alberta Students are successful.
      2. OUTCOME TWO: The achievement gap between First Nations, Metis and Inuit students andall other students is eliminated.
      3. OUTCOME THREE: Alberta’s education system is inclusive.
      4. OUTCOME FOUR: Alberta has excellent teachers, school and school authority leaders.
        1. Jurisdiction Outcome 4-A
      5. OUTCOME FIVE: The education system is well governed and managed.

VISTA VIRTUAL SCHOOL
Three Year Education Plan
2018-2019
November 30, 2018

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section 1: School Context: Foundation Statements, History and Demographics
School Council Involvement in Education Plan Development
Education Plan Distribution
PHPS Foundation Statements
School Foundation Statements
Historical Background
Demographics
Section 2: Outcomes, Measures, Strategies and Commentary
Alignment of Outcomes to Key Strategies
SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY FOCUS
OUTCOME ONE: Alberta Students are successful.
OUTCOME TWO: The achievement gap between First Nations, Metis and Inuit students and all
other students is eliminated.
OUTCOME THREE: Alberta’s education system is inclusive.
Jurisdiction Outcome 3-A
OUTCOME FOUR: Alberta has excellent teachers, school and school authority leaders.
Jurisdiction Outcome 4-A
OUTCOME FIVE: The education system is well governed and managed.
Section 3: Performance Measure Results and other Quantitative Data
OUTCOME ONE: Alberta Students are successful.
OUTCOME TWO: The achievement gap between First Nations, Metis and Inuit students and all
other students is eliminated.
OUTCOME THREE: Alberta’s education system is inclusive.
OUTCOME FOUR: Alberta has excellent teachers, school and school authority leaders.
Jurisdiction Outcome 4-A
OUTCOME FIVE: The education system is well governed and managed.
1

 
Section 1: School Context: Foundation Statements, History and Demographics
School Council Involvement in Education Plan Development
Vista Virtual School has made several attempts to establish a viable School Council. Our efforts to date
have foundered on the realities of distance and parental accessibility. At present, we do not have an
established School Council. That being said, our teachers, (especially Elementary and Junior High
teachers) are in close communication with parents, likely more so that one would see in a “bricks and
mortar” school. We openly solicit parental involvement at an Ad Hoc basis.
Education Plan Distribution
This Education Plan will be posted on the School website where a ‘pdf’ version will be available for
download. In addition, copies of this plan will be available in the school library and at the office.
The Education Plan will be updated after receiving additional results from Provincial Achievement tests,
Provincial Diploma Exams and other sources. The updated version will be posted on the website and
submitted to the superintendent of Pembina Hills Regional Division.
PHPS Foundation Statements
Mandate
Pembina Hills School Division shall deliver an education program consistent with the Alberta School Act.
Purpose
Our purpose is to ensure the delivery of an excellent education to our students so they become ethical
citizens who contribute to society.
Motto
"Together we learn"
2

 
School Foundation Statements
Vista Virtual School provides high quality education for all our students. Our school is founded on the
following core beliefs:
Everyone works and learns best in an atmosphere of safety.
Open and honest communication is essential.
A climate of respect promotes efficient and creative learning.
Professional relationships among students, parent, and teachers promote commitment and
desire for continued learning.
Teamwork among students, partners, parents, and staff is essential for enjoyable learning
experiences.
Students thrive in environments of hope and encouragement.
The distributed learning environment is a powerful environment in which to develop positive
skills, abilities, and attitudes.
Distance learning programs work because of focused students, supportive parents, and
dedicated staff.
Our specific beliefs inspire our work with our key participants:
Students are unique and must be provided with effective student-centred programs.
Parents are valued partners seeking the best educational opportunities for their children.
Our staff are professionals dedicated to providing quality student-centred education while
encouraging continuous progress.
These beliefs guide our actions in providing the best education possible for approximately 500 full-time
students across the province and ensuring equitable access to education to over 10, 000 part-time
students.
Our motto is “No Limits”.
Historical Background
Vista Virtual School was started in 1996 to meet an emergent need to address demands for quality
online education. The school started modestly with 110 students and shared staff with Alberta Distance
Learning Centre. Vista Virtual School is now an independent community school under the auspices of
PHPS. Staffing has increased from 3 in 1996 to a current staff complement of 30 FTE teachers and 8 FTE
support staff. Enrolment grew from 13 students to almost 500 full time students and over 10,000
part-time registrants.
Vista Virtual School’s Alberta Education code is 2317. Initially, students were provided with computers;
as technology became more robust and readily available, Vista Virtual School was able to support
student learning on their own computer platforms at home.
3

 
Our school’s course offerings have broadened over time to better serve our students. We provide a full
range of online and print-based courses in grades 1-9. Online courses are offered to students in grades
10-12.
Most importantly, the nature of the students we serve has changed over the last two decades. In many
respects, Vista Virtual School has become similar to an Outreach school. We serve many students for
whom conventional schools have not worked. Some of our students have not found their previous
schools safe places to be; others are elite athletes or accomplished musicians who cannot maintain their
career in these areas and go to a regular 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. school. Some of our students are
travelling with their parents for a year; some are very ill and need a comprehensive yet flexible
curriculum that can be delivered at home. A growing number of our students have special needs,
and/or special circumstances that can be addressed by the flexibility we offer in timeline for completion
and course load.
Vista Virtual School maintains its own identity distinct from partners such as ADLC. As a community
school we receive the same per student grant funding as do other community schools. We receive
targeted funding for initiatives such as FNMI, French Immersion, refugee support and others. We
provide access to the same services that students in any community school would expect, such as
academic counseling, access to field trips, extracurricular and enhancement activities, awards
ceremonies, a formal commencement ceremony and regular interaction with school staff. Alberta
Education does not provide money for infrastructure to online schools.
Demographics
Vista Virtual is PHPS’s biggest school in terms of sheer numbers enrolled, as well, its geography is
provincial in scope rather than being confined to the boundaries of PHPS. Our campus locations are
Barrhead, Edmonton, and Calgary.
We have 38 staff; most work out of one of the above campuses, but we also have several staff working
out of home offices. Leadership staff consist of a Principal and an Associate Principal. As well, Vista
Virtual School is served by 2 FTE certificated academic counsellors and 1 FTE Special Education teacher.
The Principal also serves as the school’s Attendance Officer.
We offer conventional September registration for students in grades 1-9 and year-round registration for
high school students. In the 2017-18 school year, Vista Virtual School served 10,734 students.
196 full-time students in grades 1-9
300 full-time students in grades 10-12
9400 part-time students in grades 10-12
The bulk of our students are in high school, specifically grade 12. Students come from approximately 200
communities in Alberta. Enrollment continues to increase, with significant increases being evident over
the past three years.
4

 
Section 2: Outcomes, Measures, Strategies and Commentary
Alignment of Outcomes to Key Strategies
Bold, black
text represents Outcomes defined by Alberta Education.
Links
are identified as underlined and blue.
Blue text represents Outcomes, Measures, Priorities or Strategies defined by the Jurisdiction.
2018-2019
OUTCOME ONE
: Alberta’s Students are successful.
OUTCOME TWO
: Alberta's education system supports First Nations, Métis and Inuit students'
success.
OUTCOME THREE
: Alberta’s education system respects diversity and promotes inclusion.
Jurisdiction Outcome 3-A
: Children in PHPS communities access inclusive early learning programs
guided by jurisdiction quality standards. Effective inclusive programs are achieved through
collaborative development and implementation.
OUTCOME FOUR
: Alberta has excellent teachers, school and school authority leaders.
Jurisdiction Outcome 4-A
: PHPS learning environments are varied, flexible and predictive of
students’ diverse learning needs. They exemplify balanced, evidence based assessments that inform
instruction.
OUTCOME FIVE
: The education system is well governed and managed.
Jurisdiction Outcome 5-A
: The jurisdiction demonstrates sound fiscal management, considering the
needs of the community.
5

 
SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY FOCUS
Bridging from Provincial Outcomes and District Priorities and Strategies to School Strategies
Address the Diversity of Student Needs
Addressing the Diversity of Student Needs is everyone’s responsibility.
Response to Intervention is the framework of strategies applied at all levels.
Alberta
Education
Outcome(s)
impacted
District and School level staff deployment decisions will prioritize school
level supports of Tier 2 students.
1, 2, 3
In our school we will:
VVS generally applies supports on an individualized basis to all students and does not limit
its analysis to Tier 2 students
Schools will implement the Mental Health Literacy project, guided by and
supported by the district Coordinator of Counselling
3
In our school we will:
Apply training obtained in 2017-18, in which all VVS staff received Mental Health Literacy
training, by looking at individual cases as they arise through Students of Concern Meetings
Schools will implement the Mental Health Literacy project, guided by and
supported by the district Coordinator of Counselling
The principal’s role is to:
Coordinate implementation of the Mental Health Literacy Project at
their school
Facilitate collaboration between the coordinator and classroom
teachers
Monitor how the needs of students and staff are being addressed
4
In our school we will:
Ensure application of Mental Health Literacy skills and examine opportunities to extend
learning into Mental Health First Aid
Additional school strategies to address the Diversity of Student Needs
In our school we will:
Actively demonstrate and support a safe, caring, respectful and welcoming learning
environment. This will include:
Assessing new student’s files to identify potential specialized needs
Determine, through a coordinated effort, needed accommodations and program
modifications for these students.
Create a priority list for psycho-educational assessments through file assessments and
teacher observations by November each year (ongoing for high school students as
they enter our program)
Design & implement an effective student monitoring processes
6

Measures - Impact of strategies to Address the Diversity of Student
Needs
Recent Data
2016
2017
2018
Percentage of students identified with diverse needs and provided with
an IPP.
Percentage of students with “500” code
Number of created instructional videos/assessment activities that
provide for multiple means of representation
n/a
40
95
Student-Teacher Relationships
Student-Teacher Relationships are everyone’s responsibility.
Strategies will be focused in grades 7-12.
Alberta
Education
Outcome(s)
impacted
District High Schools will continue to address the principles of Moving Forward
with High School Redesign.
1
In our school we will:
Continue to modify assessments to address varying learner needs.
Continue to design supporting instructional materials to address varying learner needs
Schools will implement a Mental Health Literacy project, guided by and
supported by the district Coordinator of Counselling.
3
In our school we will (repeated from Diversity above):
Apply the skills obtained through staff training in 2017-18 school year to Students of
Concern Meetings
Staff deployment and programming structures will focus on transitions from:
Elementary to Junior High
Junior High to Senior High
3
In our school we will:
Have students complete a brief tutorial module helping them develop/demonstrate basic
skills with online learning, modeled on COM1255.
The comprehensive professional development plan will be intentionally designed
to:
Provide training and Professional Development for Principals
Support implementation of the Mental Health Literacy Project
Support implementation of Moving Forward With High School Redesign
4
In our school we will:
Provide release time for staff to implement these initiative where appropriate
7

Analyze the school’s capacity to move beyond Literacy to Mental Health First Aid
Additional school strategies focused on Student - Teacher Relationships
In our school we will:
Reference specific percentages through the course to encourage a “game type” approach to
goal setting (eg: “You are 40% of the way through, can you hit 50% in two weeks?”)
Assign target number of IPP identified students per individual teacher to maintain family a
connection to a teacher about IPP for the year. Come together as a group bi-monthly
meetings - concerns, success stories will be discussed as a group.
Meet in person with elementary families before the SPT interviews
Publish a Grade 1 monthly newsletter containing student work, parent ideas and learning
strategies is distributed
Continue regular face-to-face sessions with students and parents
Provide staff with the tools (in VV SIS) to measure incoming vs outgoing communications
and more accurately track responses to teacher-initiated contact
Measures - Impact of strategies focused on Student Teacher Relationships
PAT and reading comprehension assessments
Numeracy
Everyone is a teacher of Numeracy.
Strategies will be focused in grades 4-6.
Alberta
Education
Outcome(s)
impacted
All schools administer the Math Intervention and Programming Instrument
(MIPI) in grades 2 through 9, (and maybe grade 10), during September
After the MIPI is administered, school principals will lead a focused
analysis of the student data collected by the MIPI. The data will be used
to inform instruction, as well as to inform professional learning needs of
teachers.
1
In our school we will:
Administer the MIPI in grades 2-5 immediately to develop effective processes at a distance
Modify or supplement instruction in these grades based on MIPI results
Apply processes to gradual implementation up to Grade 9
Professional development will:
Be responsive to emerging needs of grade 4-6 teachers (as observed by
the potential coordinator, principal, and teachers)
Support a Community of Practice of grades 7-9 Math teachers
Maintain awareness of the cross curricular integration of Numeracy,
applicable at all levels - All teachers are Numeracy teachers
4
8

In our school we will:
Maintain participation at a distance in district numeracy PD sessions & Community of
Practice
The principal’s role is to ensure implementation and alignment by:
Coordinating MIPI implementation
Facilitating collaboration between the potential coordinator and
classroom teachers
4
In our school we will:
Collaborate and share numeracy resources and pedagogical knowledge with VVS colleagues
Additional school strategies focused on Numeracy
In our school we will:
Continue to promote numeracy connections to everyday life
Continue to impress upon parents the importance of learning numeracy skills to
automaticity
Provide tutorials/instruction on specific, relevant skills (e.g interpreting graphs,
visual-spatial analysis) in each course, particularly in humanities.
Supply to parents additional games/activities to improve numeracy skills
Make cross-curricular connections in areas i.e. graphing assignments found in Math and
Science (throughout gr. 7-9). Does student knowledge of struggling concepts if teachers
share known areas where improvement is required.
Measures - Impact of strategies focused on Numeracy
Measures - Impact of strategies focused on Numeracy
Recent Data
2019
2016
2017
2018
Number of students (Grades 2-5) administered the MIPI by the
end of October
n/a
n/a
n/a
30 out
of 31
Number of students (Grades 2-5) achieving 80% mastery on
Unit assessments
n/a
n/a
n/a
Does student/parent knowledge of struggling concepts
produce improvement.
Measure effectiveness of assignments assessing numeracy
skills, using data from sis/moodle
Literacy
Everyone is a teacher of Literacy.
Alberta
Education
9

Strategies will be focused in K-3.
Outcome(s)
impacted
All elementary schools will administer the RRST and BAS assessments. This is
non-negotiable and will be supported by site principals. Any release time
decisions in this regard will come from site based budgets.
1
In our school we will:
Administer the RRST to Grade 1 students
Continue to regularly administer benchmark reading assessments
Continue to model and send additional strategies to parents to encourage literacy
Continue to use the Words Their Way program in Grades 2-3
All Kindergarten to grade 3 teachers are expected to participate in this strategy
and align instruction and interventions to the non-negotiable district standard.
1
In our school we will:
Continue to attend PD sessions on literacy
Continue to use levelled readers and novels that match reading ability and student interest
Schools will review staff deployment and assignments in order to assign a Lead
Literacy Teacher at their sites to support the Literacy strategy. The job
description for this role will be specifically designed to:
Work elbow to elbow with teachers
Guide the analysis of assessment data
Guide selection of instructional strategies
Serve as a site based Literacy ‘point person’
In our school we will:
Work with other PHPS schools in Divisional literacy initiatives
Financial support will be designated to maintain the Junior High Reading Project
($10,000)
1
In our school we will:
VVS does not participate in this particular initiative owing to the dispersed nature of our
Junior High students
The principal’s role is to ensure implementation and alignment by:
Coordinating RRST and BAS implementation
Facilitating collaboration between the coordinator, lead literacy
teachers and classroom teachers
Monitoring implementation of the Literacy strategy
Being a participant in professional learning
And insisting on alignment to district standard
In our school we will:
10

Professional development will:
Be responsive to emerging needs of K-3 teachers (as observed by the
coordinator, principal, and teachers)
Maintain awareness of the cross curricular integration of Literacy,
applicable at all levels - All teachers are Literacy teachers
4
In our school we will:
Ensure awareness of the need for cross curricular integration of literacy at all grades
Additional school strategies focused on Literacy
In our school we will:
Design alternate exams in junior high that are worded differently i.e. for ESL students or
students who are reading at an elementary level
Evaluate assessment instructions and where necessary modify/expand on the instructions
to reduce confusion from technical/subject-specific vocabulary. Eg students
misunderstanding assignment asking to respond in first-person perspective.
Facilitate note-taking skills and strategies for students, e.g notes pages per module, or
Quizlet notes/flash cards, glossary entries
Measures - Impact of strategies focused on Literacy
Measures - Impact of strategies focused on Literacy
Recent Data
Target
2019
2016
2017
2018
Grade 1 students will have the RRST administered
7 out
of 8
All newly registered Grade 2-3 students will have a benchmark
assessment
12 out
of 13
Grades 4-5 students will have a oral reading assessment and
sight word inventory given
21 out
of 21
11

 
OUTCOME ONE: Alberta Students are successful.
View Measurement data in Section 3.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
1.1 PAT Acceptable and Excellence
Overall percentage of students in Grades 6 and 9 who achieved
the acceptable standard, and the percentage who achieved the standard of excellence on
Provincial Achievement Tests (overall cohort results).
1.2 PDE Acceptable and Excellence
Overall percentage of students who achieved the acceptable
standard, and overall percentage of students who achieved the standard of excellence on
Diploma Examinations (overall results).
1.3 High School Completion Rate
High school completion rate of students within three years of
entering Grade 10.
1.4 Drop Out rate
Annual dropout rate of students aged 14 to 18.
1.5 Transition Rate (6 yr)
High school to post-secondary transition rate of students within six years
of entering Grade 10.
1.6 Rutherford Scholarship Rate (Revised)
Percentage of Grade 12 students eligible for a
Rutherford Scholarship.
1.7
Diploma Exam Participation Rate (4+ Exams)
Percentage of students writing four or more
Diploma Exams within three years of entering Grade 10.
1.8 Citizenship
Overall teacher, parent and student agreement that students model the
characteristics of active citizenship.
1.9 Work Preparation
Overall teacher and parent agreement that students are taught attitudes and
behaviours that will make them successful at work when they finish school
Jurisdiction Measures:
1.10
Percentage of Full Time Equivalent assigned by each school to address a guidance program that
includes career, educational and personal counseling.
1.11
Number and Percentage of students (in grades 7-12) on honor rolls (based on Rutherford
criteria).
1.12
Number and Percentage of students involved with or who participated in service projects.
1.13
Number and Percentage of grade 10-12 full time students participating in sessions for students
on career decision-making
1.14
Number of parents of minor grade 10-12 full time students participating in sessions for students
on career decision-making.
1.15
Number and Percentage of grade 10-12 students earning (3 or more) credits through Work
Experience, RAP, Green Certificate programs and local programs such as Petroleum Field
Operators program.
School Measures:
1.16
Number of credits completed monthly. Annual benchmark on DATE (target :3-5% yearly
increase per student)
ADLC
VVS
Block Funding Counts
1.17
Assessment of number of contacts with teacher monthly. Baseline to
be created.
12

1.3
Video Hits
1.4
Audio Exam Created and Used
Strategies
See the strategies described under the section
Bridging from Provincial Outcomes and District
Priorities and Strategies to School Strategies
, above.
Priority: Increasing successful course completions.
VVS Teachers and Administration will review the registration intake process each semester to
identify practices that provide students and their parents with information needed to help
them decide if they have the study skills, independence, family support and discipline to be
successful in an online learning environment.
Continue to work with ADLC staff in developing and piloting courses to ensure that courses
are comprehensive and accessible.
Create short teacher made instructional videos to improve student comprehension of difficult
concepts. Use other instructional adjuncts such as Adobe Connect, Livescribe, Skype,
Successmaker, Study Forge, YouTube, etc. as needed.
Ensure that students are registered in suitable courses for optimal success
Create checklists as needed to help students become organized. Provide review opportunities
prior to exams.
Provide evening help desk access in Science and Math in conjunction with ADLC.
Elementary teachers will meet face to face where practical, students will orally read to
teachers over Skype. Provide individualized instruction where needed.
Implement selective release in courses to ensure students are able to practice and respond to
feedback before continuing forward in course work
Increase student awareness and enrollment in Off Campus Programming .
Continued support of leveled readers in Division I.
Academic Counsellors will continue to build relationships with mental health agencies and
other social support agencies.
Academic Counsellors and Special Education teacher continue to supply leadership and
direction at monthly Student of Concern meetings, (case conferences).
Report on progress through 2017-2018 school year
Comment on Accountability Pillar Measures:
PAT Acceptable and Excellence
Vista Virtual School encourages all eligible students to participate in PATs. The nature
of VVS students, being distant to varying VVS campuses, makes such participation
challenging. VVS does allow, and is open to, students who may be able to participate
in a limited number of, and not all, PATs.
PDE Acceptable and Excellence
These statistics include all VVS students, including hundreds if not thousands of part
time students for whom VVS is responsible for course instruction but not the overall
education program of a student. VVS has noted significant high achievement in
acceptable and excellent results across several courses and is in the process of
analyzing these results with teaching staff.
High School Completion Rate
These statistics only include students who have been with VVS for the entirety of their
high school career. While VVS has hundreds, if not thousands of students, the
13

 
students captured in these statistics number in the dozens.
Drop Out rate
These statistics include all VVS students, including the hundreds, if not thousands, of
part time students for whom VVS is responsible for course instruction but not the
overall education program of a student
Transition Rate (6 yr)
These statistics incorporate students who undertook their entire high school program
with VVS, which captures dozens and not thousands of students.
Rutherford Scholarship Rate (Revised)
These statistics include all VVS students, including part time students for whom VVS is
responsible for course instruction but not the overall education program of a student
Diploma Exam Participation Rate (4+ Exams)
VVS has hundreds, if not thousands, of part time students who take only one or two
courses with the school.
Citizenship
VVS undertakes community based activities where possible with a distant group of full
time students, and is cognizant of citizenship expectations for all students in ethical
academic pursuits.
Work Preparation
The independent nature of VVS courses contributes to organization and discipline
skills that emulate the expectations of the work environment.
Report on Key School Strategies:
Increasing Successful Course Completions
Classroom Improvement funds allowed for the design and implementation of
instructional video resources to which students have have a positive response.
Additional teaching staff was hired to provide additional instructional capacity and
expertise. The most accurate data for completions is not available until early in the
new school year.
OUTCOME TWO: The achievement gap between First Nations, Metis and Inuit students and
all other students is eliminated.
View Measurement data in Section 3.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
2.1 PAT Acceptable and Excellence
Overall percentage of self-identified FNMI students in Grades 6
and 9 who achieved the acceptable standard, and the percentage of self-identified FNMI who
achieved the standard of excellence on Provincial Achievement Tests (overall cohort results).
2.2 PDE Acceptable and Excellence
Overall percentage of self-identified FNMI students who
achieved the acceptable standard, and overall percentage of self-identified FNMI students who
achieved the standard of excellence on Diploma Examinations (overall results).
2.3 High School Completion Rate
High school completion rate of self-identified FNMI students
within three years of entering Grade 10.
2.4 Drop Out rate
Annual dropout rate of self-identified FNMI students aged 14 to 18.
14

 
2.5 Transition Rate (6 yr)
High school to post-secondary transition rate of self-identified FNMI
students within six years of entering Grade 10.
2.6 Rutherford Scholarship Rate (Revised)
Percentage of self-identified FNMI Grade 12 students
eligible for a Rutherford Scholarship.
2.7
Diploma Exam Participation Rate (4+ Exams)
Percentage of self-identified FNMI students
writing four or more Diploma Exams within three years of entering Grade 10.
Strategies
See the strategies described under the section
Bridging from Provincial Outcomes and District
Priorities and Strategies to School Strategies
, above.
Key School Level Strategies Include:
Supporting ongoing staff attendance at FNMI themed professional development and
relationship building activities
Informing students and their parents about the educational benefits of self identification of
FNMI status.
Informing students of ADLC FNMI-themed or culture friendly courses such as CTS courses that
include aspects of native culture such as Cultural Fashion Production, and Fashion Illustration
should be promoted.
Incorporating activities at SPT interviews and activity days that support Indigenous themes.
Using the added FNMI indicator in SIS to ensure that teachers are alert to personalization
opportunities with their students.
Report on progress through 2017-2018 school year
Accountability Pillar Measures:
See notes in Outcome 1 Commentary section
OUTCOME THREE: Alberta’s education system is inclusive.
View Measurement data in Section 3.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
3.1 Safe and Caring:
Overall teacher, parent and student agreement that students are safe at
school, learning the importance of caring for others, learning respect for others and are treated
fairly at school.
3.2 At Risk Students:
Percentage of teacher, parent and student agreement that programs for
children at risk are easy to access and timely. (This measure added to jurisdiction plan in 2016.)
Jurisdiction Measures:
3.3
Number and Percentage of students with Individual Program Plans (I.P.P).
3.4
Number of coded students who graduate (code 41 to 46).
Strategies
See the strategies described under the section
Bridging from Provincial Outcomes and District Priorities
15

and Strategies to School Strategies
, above.
Key School Level Strategies Include:
Increased identification of students with Special Needs to better support success. This starts with
identification in SIS and follows through to having teachers and the Special Education Teacher
provide support as possible.
Continue to increase understanding and work with the Universal Design for Learning framework as
a guideline for teachers to develop and deliver accessible instruction to students that supports:
Multiple means of representation
Multiple means of action and expression
Multiple means of engagement
Continue to support LGBTQ students directly through enrollments and indirectly by support of
Queer Prom, Camp Fyrefly, and/or Pride Parade. Distance learning can provide a safe space for
LGBTQ students if staff, policies and procedures are supportive; Vista-Virtual school is a safe and
supportive place.
Offering virtual and face-to-face opportunities for students and staff to interact to build
relationship opportunities. Field trips and activity days ,awards and graduation are examples of
face to face opportunities; social media, including blog posts and discussion boards are examples
of virtual interactions.
Teaching students (and their parents if needed) strategies to be successful in meeting the
academic demands of distance education. Continue to support VVS full-time face-to-face intake
process as this both informs students and their parents of school expectations, and strategies for
success.
Staff collaboratively and regularly share best practices and research with each other.
Report on progress through 2017-2018 school year
Accountability Pillar Measures:
Safe and Caring
VVS acts in accordance with all expectations for a Safe & Caring School. One of the
challenges in the data is that students and parents often see “their school” as their
previous or, in the case of part time students, their current traditional school setting. As a
result, students and parents have often responded to this question in the context of that
other school and not the VVS setting. When VVS follows up, they frequently report
(anecdotally) that VVS addresses these expectations.
At Risk Students
VVS is very responsive to individualized student needs in terms of timelines or course
selection.
Report on Key School Strategies:
VVS has a well established school culture that respects diversity and seeks to continually find new
strategies to make students feel welcome and part of an extended school community. As noted
above, VVS students frequently comment on the safety the feel in the school when provided a
context for Accountability Pillar surveys, which confuse VVS students who may not necessarily
identify VVS as their primary school. VVS has made strides to identify unique student needs and
undertakes regularly scheduled case conferences (called Students of Concern Meetings) to discuss
cross curricular strengths and challenges for identified students. The ongoing promotion of LGTBQ
safe events, like the queer prom, underlines the school’s commitment to serving this population.
Finally, VVS has undertaken numerous educational field trips to build a greater sense of
community and ensure students have a relationship with school staff.
16

 
OUTCOME FOUR: Alberta has excellent teachers, school and school authority leaders.
View Measurement data in Section 3.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
4.1 Program of Studies
Overall teacher, parent and student satisfaction with the opportunity for
students to receive a broad program of studies, including fine arts, career, technology, and
health and physical education.
Jurisdiction Measures:
4.2
(ACOL Measure – In-service Jurisdiction Needs)
Percentages of teachers reporting that in the
past 3-5 years the professional development and in-servicing received from the school authority
has been focused, systematic and contributed significantly to their ongoing professional growth
.
4.3
PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students satisfied that
teachers challenge students to do their best.
4.4
PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students satisfied with the
performance of their school administrators.
(VVS parents and students are not asked this question)
Jurisdiction Outcome 4-A
PHPS learning environments are varied, flexible and predictive of students’ diverse learning needs
and exemplify balanced, evidence based assessments that inform instruction.
Jurisdiction Measures:
4-A.1 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Assessment and Feedback. Percentage of parents and
students satisfied with the communication they get about progress and achievement.
Percentage of teachers who report prevalent application of evidentiary assessments and
feedback for scaffolding subsequent learning.
4-A.2 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Active Professional Learning Community. Percentage of staff
agreeing that their principal and or vice principal regularly observes student learning in their
classes, and the rate at which students feel their principal and or vice principal knows what is
happening in their classes.
4-A.3
PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Clarity of Learning Goals. The degree of prevalence at which
teachers clarify lesson goals and attempt to predict the variance of students’ skills, knowledge
and previous understanding.
4-A.4 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey
: Response to diversity of student needs. Percentage of
students who are satisfied that their teachers know them as individuals and know what they
need as learners. Also, the prevalence of teacher practice wherein they offer students choices
from a range of difficulty and complexity.
4-A.5 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Meeting learning needs. Percentage of parents agreeing that
their children appear confident about what they are learning at school.
17

 
Strategies
See the strategies described under the section
Bridging from Provincial Outcomes and District
Priorities and Strategies to School Strategies
, above.
Priority: Flexible Approach to Curriculum Delivery
Continue to ensure that PD focuses on teacher education of specific learning deficits/needs,
understanding demands of the online learning environment, understanding how students
learn in an online environment and creating a more cohesive approach to supporting this
unique group of learners.
Continue to create and use instruction tools based on assessment of student, understanding
demands of the instructional process and assessment, adapting instruction based on student
needs, providing strategies/scaffolds and ensuring that students receive direct, explicit
instruction.
Report on progress through 2017-2018 school year
Accountability Pillar Measures:
Program of Studies
VVS has generally increased its course offerings within the school; while VVS
continues to utilize services from ADLC as the provincial service provider in specialized
areas (eg: Second Languages), VVS has also started offering, with its own staff, a wider
variety of option courses.
Report on Key School Strategies:
Priority: Flexible Approach to Curriculum Delivery
VVS is primarily concerned with flexible approaches to curriculum delivery. Flexibility
in timing and location are natural fits, VVS has also looked at ways to structure
curriculum delivery to be flexible, allowing for students to enter a course like Science
10 at any unit.
OUTCOME FIVE: The education system is well governed and managed.
View Measurement data in Section 3
.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
5.1 Parental Involvement:
Overall teacher and parent satisfaction with parental involvement in
decisions about their child’s education.
5.2 School Improvement
: Overall percentage of teachers, parents and students indicating that their
school and schools in their jurisdiction have improved or stayed the same the last three years.
5.3 Education Quality
: Overall teacher, parent and student satisfaction with the overall quality of
basic education.
Jurisdiction Measures:
5.4
(ACOL Measure – Satisfaction with Program Access)
Percentage of teachers, parents and
students satisfied with the accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of programs and services
for students in their community.
18

5.5 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students satisfied with the
overall quality of education the
Vista Virtual S
chool provides.
5.6 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students who give their
school of “excellent”, “proficient” or “acceptable”.
(VVS parents and students are not asked this
question)
5.7 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students who are satisfied
with opportunities to be involved in decisions affecting the school (and students).
(VVS parents
and students are not asked this question)
5.8 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of teachers and students satisfied with the
recognition they receive for their accomplishments.
(VVS students are not asked this question)
5.9
Amount of money acquired from third parties in support of community schools.
5.10
Number of registered* parent/community volunteers in schools. (“Registered” means they
have been vetted as per AP 40-60 – Volunteers in School).
5.11
Number of school activities/events taking place in the community. (Quantify events which
involve students and the community or parents. This includes but is not limited to school
concerts and ceremonies, sporting events, field trips and excursions, guests in the classroom
and /or school, etc.)
5.12
Number of off-campus partners supporting students in Work Experience, Registered
Apprenticeship, Green Certificate and or Dual Credit programs. (NEW Measure in 2015)
Strategies
See the strategies described under the section
Bridging from Provincial Outcomes and District
Priorities and Strategies to School Strategies
, above.
Key School Level Strategies Include:
Support on-going SIS and website enhancements so that they are designed for the unique
needs of VVS.
Brokering renewed letters of understanding between VVS and ADLC to mutual benefit.
Continue to work toward enhanced alignment between PASI, SIS and the school budget
Maintain and enhance communication through electronic and social media.
Continue to support teachers working at all campuses and those unique situations working
from home via regular professional conversations.
Continue to develop metrics within SIS that provide indications of teacher/student
engagement and effectiveness
Continue to refine the VVS registration process such that it is automated or semi-automated.
Report on progress through 2017-2018 school year
Accountability Pillar Measures:
Parental Involvement
VVS has involved parents on all electronic communication with students under the
age of 18 who are not independent, and parents are involved in full time student
intakes.
School Improvement
VVS has continuously reviewed school programming, but it is noteworthy that the
school has a transient student population who are often in the school for only a few,
or even one, course. The majority of VVS students do not generally have a context to
19

make comparisons for improvements from year to year.
Education Quality
VVS has a commitment to continuously review course content and delivery methods
(eg this year’s Math Dept item analysis spreadsheet). There has been a trend of
improvement in the VVS data over the past several years.
Report on Key School Strategies:
VVS was able to complete a new round of cooperative letters with ADLC early in the first
semester of 2017-18. This provided, for a fee, access to services from ADLC that functioned
identically, or near identically, between the two schools. The evolution of the custom Student
Information System (SIS) was slow but has progressed, with frequent discussions with ADLC
about common solutions to common issues. This year also saw the initial launch of a
semi-automated online registration process; while this process was functional it did point to
potential improvements in subsequent iterations.
20

 
Section 3: Performance Measure Results and other Quantitative Data
OUTCOME ONE: Alberta Students are successful.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
1.1 PAT Acceptable and Excellence
Overall percentage of students in Grades 6 and 9 who achieved
the acceptable standard, and the percentage who achieved the standard of excellence on
Provincial Achievement Tests (overall cohort results).
School Data (From October APORI)
2017
Previous 3 year Avg
N
Acceptable
Standard
Standard of
Excellence
N
Acceptable
Standard
Standard of
Excellence
64
1.6
0.4
58
1.9
0.5
2016-2017 School Multi-Year PAT Reports: All Subjects
1.2 PDE Acceptable and Excellence
Overall percentage of students who achieved the acceptable
standard, and overall percentage of students who achieved the standard of excellence on Diploma
examinations (overall results).
School Data (From October APORI)
2017
Previous 3 year Avg
N
Acceptable
Standard
Standard of
Excellence
N
Acceptable
Standard
Standard of
Excellence
723
89.0
30.9
725
86.2
21.5
2016-2017 School Multi-Year PDE Reports: All Subjects
1.3 High School Completion Rate
High school completion rate of students within three years of
entering Grade 10.
(APORI Data, comes in May, and is one year delayed).
2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
3 Year
0.0
0.0
0.0
2.6
8.1
14.8
33.3
4 Year
8.9
0.0
9.3
7.1
13.3
17.7
36.4
5 Year
15.5
17.8
12.7
11.5
11.5
19.3
36.1
1.4 Drop Out rate
Annual dropout rate of students aged 14 to 18.
(APORI Data, comes in May, and is one year delayed).
2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Overall
7.8
10.2
5.0
4.8
4.5
7.2
4.4
21

1.5 Transition Rate (6 yr)
High school to post-secondary transition rate of students within six years of
entering Grade 10.
(APORI Data, comes in May, and is one year delayed).
2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
4 year
9.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.2
9.9
5.9
6 Year
11.9
7.6
8.5
6.4
13.1
4.5
26.8
1.6 Rutherford Scholarship Rate (Revised)
Percentage of Grade 12 students eligible for a Rutherford
Scholarship.
(APORI Data, comes in May, and is one year delayed).
2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Percentage
59.5
64.3
65.2
65.5
66.4
68.2
68.5
1.7 Diploma Exam Participation Rate (4+ Exams)
Percentage of students writing four or more
Diploma Exams within three years of entering Grade 10.
(APORI Data, comes in May, and is one year delayed).
2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Percentage
0.0
0.0
0.0
3.8
3.3
12.8
17.8
1.8 Citizenship
Overall teacher, parent and student agreement that students model the
characteristics of active citizenship.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
61.7
61.6
67.0
67.0
72.8
92.6
78.6
Parents
n/a
n/a
*
*
n/a
n/a
*
Students
52.4
55.3
54.7
53.6
62.7
n/a
59.3
Teachers
71.0
67.9
79.3
80.4
82.9
92.6
97.9
1.9 Work Preparation
Overall teacher and parent agreement that students are taught attitudes and
behaviours that will make them successful at work when they finish school.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
85.0
82.4
84.2
80.0
95.0
100
96.0
Parents
n/a
n/a
*
n/a
n/a
n/a
*
Teachers
85.0
82.4
84.2
80.0
95.0
100
96.0
22

Jurisdiction Measures:
1.10
Percentage of Full Time Equivalent assigned by each school to address a guidance program that
includes career, educational and personal counseling.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Percent
1.11
Number and Percentage of students (in grades 7-12) on honor rolls (based on Rutherford criteria).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
Percent
1.12
Number and Percentage of students involved with or who participated in service projects.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
Percent
1.13
Number and Percentage of grade 10-12 full time students participating in sessions for students
on career decision-making .
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
Percent
1.14
Number of parents of minor grade 10-12 full time students participating in sessions for students
on career decision-making.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
1.15
Number and Percentage of grade 10-12 students earning (3 or more) credits through Work
Experience, RAP, Green Certificate programs and local programs such as Petroleum Field
Operators program.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
Percent
1.16
Number of credits completed monthly. Annual benchmark on DATE.
23

 
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
ADLC
VVS
Block Funding Counts
1.17
Assessment of number of contacts with teacher monthly. Annual benchmark on DATE.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
VVS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OUTCOME TWO: The achievement gap between First Nations, Metis and Inuit students and
all other students is eliminated.
To protect privacy, school level FNMI data is not published.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OUTCOME THREE: Alberta’s education system is inclusive.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
3.1 Safe and Caring:
Overall teacher, parent and student agreement that students are safe at school,
learning the importance of caring for others, learning respect for others and are treated fairly at
school.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
70.7
74.3
75.8
82.6
93.3
93.3
82.7
Parents
n/a
*
*
n/a
n/a
n/a
*
Students
60.0
61.3
69.5
75.2
n/a
n/a
66.7
Teachers
81.4
87.3
82.1
90.0
93.3
93.3
98.8
3.4 At Risk Students:
Percentage of teacher, parent and student agreement that programs for
children at risk are easy to access and timely. (This measure added to jurisdiction plan in 2016.)
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
81.1
81.7
83.6
87.3
89.5
100
89.2
24

 
Parents
n/a
n/a
*
*
n/a
n/a
*
Students
65.5
73.1
67.2
77.5
78.9
n/a
79.7
Teachers
96.7
90.4
100
89.8
100
100
98.7
3.5
Number and Percentage of students with Individual Program Plans (I.P.P).
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number of students
who require IPPs
Percentage of students
who require IPPs
3.6
Number of coded students who graduate (code 41 to 46).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OUTCOME FOUR: Alberta has excellent teachers, school and school authority leaders.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
4.1 Program of Studies
Overall teacher, parent and student satisfaction with the opportunity for
students to receive a broad program of studies, including fine arts, career, technology, and health
and physical education.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
72.7
61.5
63.7
67.1
74.6
90.5
84.5
Parents
n/a
n/a
*
*
n/a
n/a
*
Students
68.3
46.6
47.6
61.4
64.9
n/a
74.4
Teachers
77.1
76.3
79.9
72.8
84.2
90.5
94.6
Jurisdiction Measures:
4.2
(ACOL Measure – In-service Jurisdiction Needs)
Percentages of teachers reporting that in the past
3-5 years the professional development and in-servicing received from the school authority has
been focused, systematic and contributed significantly to their ongoing professional growth.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Teachers
78.3
75.5
73.3
71.7
79.4
82.8
87.2
25

 
4.3 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students satisfied that
teachers challenge students to do their best.
Parents: My children’s teachers at my
Vista Virtual School
challenge students to do their best.
Students: Teachers at my
Vista Virtual School
challenge me to do my best.
Staff: Teachers at my
Vista Virtual School
challenge students to do their best.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Parents
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Students
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Staff
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4.4 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students satisfied with the
performance of their school administrators.
Parents: I am satisfied with the administration at my school.
(VVS students are not asked this question)
Students: I am satisfied with my school’s principals.
(VVS students are not asked this question)
Staff: I am satisfied with the administration at my school.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Parents
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Students
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Staff
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Jurisdiction Outcome 4-A
PHPS learning environments are varied, flexible and predictive of students’ diverse learning needs and
exemplify balanced, evidence based assessments that inform instruction.
Jurisdiction Measures:
4-A.1 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Assessment and Feedback. Percentage of parents and students
satisfied with the communication they get about progress and achievement. Percentage of
teachers who report prevalent application of evidentiary assessments and feedback for
scaffolding subsequent learning.
Parents: I am satisfied with the communication I get about my children’s achievement at
on Vista
Virtual School courses
school.
Students: My teacher tells me how I am doing in my
Vista Virtual School courses
classes.
Teachers (1): I design and/or use assessments to generate evidence of what students have and have not
yet learned. (Most or some of the time, do not count ‘rarely’).
Teachers(2): I provide students with meaningful feedback and provide necessary scaffolding to help
them to improve. (Most or some of the time, do not count ‘rarely’).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Parents
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
26

Students
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Teachers (1)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Teachers (2)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4-A.2 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Active Professional Learning Community. Percentage of staff
agreeing that their principal and or vice principal regularly observes student learning in their
classes, and the rate at which students feel their principal and or vice principal knows what is
happening in their classes.
Students: My principal knows what is happening in my classes.
(VVS students are not asked this
question)
Teachers: My principal or vice principal regularly observes student learning in my classroom.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Students
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Teachers
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4-A.3 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Clarity of Learning Goals. The degree of prevalence at which
teachers clarify lesson goals and attempt to predict the variance of students’ skills, knowledge
and previous understanding.
Teachers (1): I make sure that students know how each day’s
set of
lessons or activities connect to the
learning goals. (‘Most’ or ‘Some’ of the time, do not count ‘Rarely’).
Teachers (2): I use more than one medium to present new information; I clarify content vocabulary; and
I attempt to connect students’ background knowledge. (‘Most’ or ‘Some’ of the time, do not count
‘Rarely’).
Students: Which of the following describes you best? (Collate the ‘always or usually’ responses).
I ALWAYS know what I am supposed to learn in my
Vista Virtual School
classes.
I USUALLY know what I am supposed to learn in my
Vista Virtual School
classes.
I’m OFTEN CONFUSED about what I’m supposed to learn in
my Vista Virtual School courses
.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Teachers (1)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Teachers (2)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Students
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4-A.4 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey
: Response to diversity of student needs. Percentage of students
who are satisfied that their teachers know them as individuals and know what they need as
learners. Also, the prevalence of teacher practice wherein they offer students choices from a
range of difficulty and complexity.
Students: My teachers know ME. My teachers know what I need to learn next, even if it’s different than
someone else.
Teachers: I give students work that ranges in difficulty and complexity. (‘Most’ or ‘Some’ of the time, do
not count ‘Rarely’).
27

 
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Students
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Teachers
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4-A.5 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Meeting learning needs. Percentage of parents agreeing that
their children appear confident about what they are learning at school.
Parents: Rather than confused or frustrated, my children appear confident about what they are learning
at
Vista Virtual School
.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Parents
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OUTCOME FIVE: The education system is well governed and managed.
Accountability Pillar Measures:
5.1 Parental Involvement:
Overall teacher and parent satisfaction with parental involvement in
decisions about their child’s education.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
71.1
89.5
84.7
83.3
88.9
92.5
90.8
Parents
n.a
n/a
*
*
n/a
n/a
*
Teachers
71.1
89.5
84.7
83.3
88.9
92.5
90.8
5.2 School Improvement
: Overall percentage of teachers, parents and students indicating that their
school and schools in their jurisdiction have improved or stayed the same the last three years.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
83.5
84.3
82.7
88.7
90.2
100
91.5
Parents
n/a
n/a
*
*
n/a
n/a
*
Students
83.6
82.0
82.1
88.6
89.1
n/a
82.9
Teachers
83.3
86.7
83.3
88.9
95.0
100
100
5.3 Education Quality
: Overall teacher, parent and student satisfaction with the overall quality of
basic education.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
28

2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
88.6
93.9
89.5
94.2
93.0
99.4
95.1
Parents
n/a
n/a
*
*
n/a
n/a
*
Student
79.8
88.8
81.5
90.8
90.9
n/a
90.2
Teachers
97.5
99.1
97.5
97.5
95.2
99.4
100
Jurisdiction Measures:
5.4
(ACOL Measure – Satisfaction with Program Access)
Percentage of teachers, parents and students
satisfied with the accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of programs and services for students
in their community.
(APORI Data, comes in May).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Overall
66.7
66.7
68.3
69.6
68.2
89.4
89.3
Parents
n/a
n/a
*
*
n/a
n/a
*
Students
61.9
62.5
56.6
70.7
56.6
n/a
79.5
Teachers
71.4
70.8
80.0
68.5
79.8
89.4
99.2
5.5 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students satisfied with the
overall quality of education the school provides.
Parents: I am satisfied with the overall quality of education my children receive
from Vista Virtual
School
.
Students: I am satisfied with the overall quality of education I am receiving
from Vista Virtual School
.
Staff: I am satisfied with the overall quality of education my school provides.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Parents
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Students
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Staff
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.6 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students who give their
school of “excellent”, “proficient” or “acceptable”.
Parents: I would give my children’s school a grade of
(VVS parents are not asked this question)
Students: I would give my school a grade of
(VVS students are not asked this question)
Staff: I would give our school a grade of ...
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Parents
Students
29

Staff
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.7 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of parents, teachers and students who are satisfied
with opportunities to be involved in decisions affecting the school (and students).
Parents: I am satisfied with the opportunities for involvement in decisions affecting education at my
child(ren)'s school.
(VVS parents are not asked this question)
Students: I am satisfied with the opportunities for involvement in decisions affecting students
(VVS
students are not asked this question)
Staff: I am satisfied with the opportunities for involvement in decisions affecting school
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Parents
Students
Staff
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.8 PHPS
/VVS
Satisfaction survey:
Percentage of teachers and students satisfied with the
recognition they receive for their accomplishments.
Students: I get recognition for the good things I do.
(VVS students are not asked this question)
Staff: I get recognition for my contributions to student learning.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student
Staff
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.9
Amount of money acquired from third parties in support of community schools.
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Dollars
5.10
Number of registered* parent/community volunteers in schools. (“Registered” means they have
been vetted as per AP 40-60 – Volunteers in School).
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
5.11
Number of school activities/events taking place in the community. (Quantify events which involve
students and the community or parents. This includes but is not limited to school concerts and
ceremonies, sporting events, field trips and excursions, guests in the classroom and /or school,
etc.)
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
30

5.12
Number of off-campus partners supporting students in Work Experience, Registered
Apprenticeship, Green Certificate and or Dual Credit programs. (NEW Measure in 2015)
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Number
31

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